Course Description

Islamic Studies I (ISL101) - 2 Credit Hours

Introduces Islamic culture and stresses its importance and contribution to humanity. It addresses Sharia Law in terms of sources, underpinnings, and objectives. It also instills in students and enhances faith in its viability and all-inclusiveness. The course counts for the social science component of the university general education requirements.
Prerequisite: None.

Islamic Studies II (ISL112) - 2 Credit Hours

Discusses both community and family systems in Islam, their groundedness, and reform mechanisms. It examines the problems they encounter, and shatters misconceptions. It also presents the injunction of the Sharia Law in pertinent contexts. The course counts for the social science component of the university general education requirements.
Prerequisite: ISL 101.

Arabic Language I (ARB 101) - 2 Credit Hours

Concentrates on developing Arabic language skills in areas related to paragraph writing, orthography, punctuation, style, vocabulary, and conversation in Standard Arabic. It also enhances student's literary appreciation ability and provides morphological and syntactic insight into text analysis. This course counts for a Humanities course in the University's General Education Requirements.
Prerequisite: None.

Arabic Language II (ARB 112) - 2 Credit Hours

Focuses on developing student's Arabic language skills to higher proficiency levels in various domains, including essay writing, conversation and discussion in Standard Arabic, text analysis, style, and lexical repertoire. The course also introduces the different literary schools and their respective characteristics. It counts for a Humanities course in the University's General Education Requirements.
Prerequisite: ARB 101.

Freshman English 1 (ENG101 A) - 3 Credit Hours

Freshman English 1 (ENG101 B) - 2 Credit Hours (CoM)

Freshman English 101 (A/B) Is a skill-based writing-intensive course that develops the student's abilities in the following: basic research, effective written expression in essay and report writing, text analysis and deconstruction – all with a focus on the use of these skills in their chosen pathways. The course has a vocabulary development focus as an addendum – whereby students trace the development of meaning through the etymological origins of the language, through the contribution of Arabic, to the influence of other languages. This serves as the basis for conceptual and PBL-based research on the concepts that underpin terminology in the Engineering, Science, Medicine and Business pathways. The course counts for a Humanities course in the University's General Education Requirements.
Prerequisite: None.

Freshman English II (ENG 112A) - 3 Credit Hours

Freshman English II (ENG 112B) - 2 Credit Hours (CoM)

Freshman English II (A/B) is a skills-based course developing student's abilities in problem-solving and research-based enquiry and the presentation of findings according to international publication ("house style") requirements. The course looks at second language acquisition and cultural rhetoric as a prelude to an examination of general oral and written discourse (in argumentation and persuasion) generally, and, specifically in the students' pathway studies. It also focuses on reading comprehension and structure skills, plus test-taking competencies, requisite for the attainment of TOEFL 650 scores. The course counts for a Humanities course in the University's General Education Requirements.
Prerequisite: ENG 101.

Technical Writing (ENG 222) - 3 Credit Hours

This course develops technical vocabulary, reading, listening/speaking and research skills that enhance technical discourse via a CLIL (content and language integrated learning) and project-based curriculum delivery to facilitate advanced-level written expression that explores the technological parameters of the student's pathway studies. It encourages accessing traditional sources of information, but also by extra-curricular means (e.g. field trips, site visits, guest presentations and media/popular audio-visual resources) as a practical anchor to balance the theoretical aspects of traditional writing studies. The course counts for a Humanities course in the University's General Education Requirements.
Prerequisite: ENG 101, ENG 112.

English for Medical Students (ENG 224) - 2 Credit Hours

Is concerned with developing fluency and confidence in using English in medical contexts. It increases EFL medical students' familiarity with medical written language and discourse in different medical contexts. The focus is on carrying out specialized activities in English, but attention is given to reading comprehension skills (expanding the English general and medical vocabulary repertoire through extensive readings), academic and scientific writing skills, and technical medical terms as required. Prerequisite: ENG 101, ENG 112. Engineering Ethics (PHL 101A) - 3 Credit Hours Examines the ethical dimensions of engineering practice by appealing to relevant concepts and principles in applied ethics; professional ethics; philosophy of technology; and science, technology, and society studies. The importance of these principles for good decision making will be highlighted through analysis of the role of engineers in socially and morally complex case study scenarios illustrating practical issues such as social justice in international engineering projects; standards of professional responsibility; sustainable development; risk analysis modeling; and autonomy based rights in the workplace.
Prerequisite: None.

Biomedical Ethics (PHL 101B) - 2 Credit Hours

Presents the basic moral principles that govern medical and scientific research. It also provides insight into the application of these principles through case studies pertinent to ethical issues in international health research as well as clinical ethics.
Prerequisite: None.

Introduction to Sociocultural Anthropology (ANT 101) - 3 Credit Hours

Is an introduction to Sociocultural Anthropology. It helps students explore anthropology and its four major sub-branches. Drawing from diverse ethnographic case studies from around the world, it focuses on the significance of sociocultural anthropology for appreciating the diversity of contemporary and past human cultures and creating an awareness of ethnographic research methods and diverse anthropological perspectives. It enhances students understanding of the similarities and differences among human cultures and their appreciation of cultural constructions of realities. The course counts for a Social Science course in the University's General Education Requirements.
Prerequisite: None.

Entrepreneurial Multiculturalism (ANT 102) - 3 Credit Hours

Presents interdisciplinary knowledge on how business cultures evolve in various societies in the world. It explores as to why some individuals/social groups are more successful in entrepreneurship than others within the same societies and cross-culturally.
Prerequisite: None.

Elementary French (FRE 101) - 3 Credit Hours

Introduces the fundamental elements of the French language within a cultural context. Emphasis is places on the development of the basic language skills, vis., listening, speaking, reading, and writing, in addition to grammar and contextual vocabulary.
Prerequisite: None.

Elementary French (FRE 112) – 3 Credit Hours

Continues and builds upon the fundamental elements of the French language within a cultural context. Continued emphasis on the development of basic language skills, vis., listening, speaking, reading and writing in addition to grammar and contextual vocabulary.
Prerequisite: FRE 101.

Introduction to Psychology (PSY 101) - 3 Credit Hours

Introduces psychology and its key concepts, theories, research methods, and contributions to the understanding of human behavior. Topics include the nervous system, perception, motivation, learning and memory, social behavior, personality, developmental, and clinical psychology. The course also introduces past and current theories and contributions of eminent psychologists.
Prerequisite: None.


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